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Health Resources and Services Administration

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U.S. Department of Health & Human Services
Health Resources and Services Administration
HRSA NEWS ROOM
http://newsroom.hrsa.gov
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Friday, October 22, 2010
CONTACT: HRSA PRESS OFFICE
301-443-3376
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HRSA awards $1.6 million to support the prevention of complications from Sickle Cell Disease

HRSA has awarded $1.6 million to support the Sickle Cell Disease Treatment Demonstration Program (SCDTDP). The program is designed to establish practice models for the prevention and treatment of sickle cell disease through the coordinated efforts of providers, key stake holders, affected individuals and their families.

The new funding will create two new network programs, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn. and Primary Care Health Services in Pittsburgh, Pa.  Network programs work to improve service delivery, training of health professionals and genetic counseling and testing.

The new Network programs will bring the total of existing federally funded Network programs to nine:

Organization

City

State

Children’s Hospital and Research Center at Oakland

Oakland

CA

University of Colorado Denver

Aurora

CO

Christian Community Health Center

Chicago

IL

Johns Hopkins

Baltimore

MD

Washington University

St. Louis

MO

Newark Beth Israel Medical Center

Newark

NJ

University of Cincinnati

Cincinnati

OH

Primary Care Health Services

Pittsburgh

PA

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital

Memphis

TN


“HRSA is committed to improving the lives of people who are living with Sickle Cell Disease,” said HRSA Administrator, Dr. Mary Wakefield, Ph.D., R.N.  “Establishing more network programs gives those affected access to the care and resources they need for the management of this chronic condition.”

Networks have two main goals. The first is to support the provision of coordinated, comprehensive, culturally competent and family-centered care for individuals with sickle cell disease. The second, to work collaboratively with partners such as Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHC); nonprofit hospitals or clinics; university health centers offering primary care; subspecialty comprehensive sickle cell centers; and community-based organizations that provide resources to people with sickle cell disease. 

The funding will also allow the National Initiative for Children’s Health Quality (NICHQ) to form a National Coordinating Center (NCC) in partnership with the Boston Medical Center and the Sickle Cell Disease Association of America. The NCC will support network grantees through technical assistance and information exchange; build and sustain partnerships; centralize data collection and analysis; review and develop educational materials; identify performance measures and quality indicators; and identify best practices relative to prevention and treatment of Sickle Cell Disease. 

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The Health Resources and Services Administration is part of the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services.  HRSA is the primary federal agency responsible for improving access to health care services for people who are uninsured, isolated, or medically vulnerable.  For more information about HRSA and its programs, visit www.hrsa.gov.